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  • After hip-replacement surgery, medication use decreases

    Source - Medical Xpress

    A new study, published November 15, in the journal Pain provides information on the trajectories of prescription drug use before and after hip-replacement surgery—total hip arthroplasty (THA), one of the most common types of joint replacement surgery. Hip-replacement surgery is commonly followed by long-term reductions in the use of prescription drugs for pain and insomnia.

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  • AAOS releases criteria for treating pediatric patients with knee osteochondritis dissecans

    Source - Medical News Today

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) has released Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) to assist in the treatment and rehabilitation of pediatric patients with osteochondritis dissecans of the femoral condyle, also known as OCDknee.

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  • High rate of bone graft resorption found after Latarjet procedure for shoulder instability

    Source - Healio

    Researchers of this study note that although the open Latarjet procedure provided significant improvement in clinical scores for patients with anterior shoulder instability and glenoid bone loss, 90.5% of patients showed graft resorption on CT at 1-year postoperatively.

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  • Football's Concussion-Prevention Efforts May Be Spurring More Leg Injuries

    Source - Health US News

    "The truth is that football is a contact sport, more than any other," she said. "That's part of the game, and as a result we always see injuries. So it may be that we have to do a kind of a risk-benefit analysis.

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  • Recommendations for patient activity after knee replacement vary among surgeons

    Source - Healio

    During recovery after knee replacement surgery, exercise is critical. After initial recovery, patients will want to resume more strenuous activities. In addition to exercise prescribed by a physical therapist, several studies have shown patients who participated in athletic activities prior to surgery will want to continue this practice after surgery. However, how much activity and how strenuous this activity should be remains unclear.

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  • Most patients return to activity without pain after surgery for tarsal coalitions

    Source - Healio

    A survey of patients who underwent surgical excision of tarsal coalitions at age 18 years or younger showed 73% reported their activity was not inhibited by foot pain at midterm follow-up, and investigators found no significant differences in patient-reported outcomes between those treated for calcaneonavicular and talocalcaneal conditions.

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  • Stresses on elbow during pitching may alter multiple structures

    Source - Healio

    In a pre- and post-season ultrasound evaluation of high school pitchers’ elbows, adaptive changes occurred to multiple structures about the elbow from stresses placed on the elbow during one season of pitching, based on results of a recently published study.

     

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  • Cholesterol levels and tendon pain may be related

    Source - Reuters

    (Reuters Health) – People with unhealthy blood cholesterol levels are more likely to have tendon pain or altered tendon structure, according to a new review.

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  • New FES device could improve gait in patients with foot drop

    Source - Healio

    The WalkAide, a novel system that uses single channel functional electric stimulation to improve gait, could be beneficial for patients with foot drop, according to data presented here at the New Jersey Chapter of the American Academy of Orthotists and Prosthetists Annual Meeting.

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  • Activity could help keep knees lubricated

    Source - Science Daily

    Cartilage is filled with fluid -- about 80% of the volume of the cartilage tissue -- that plays the essential roles of supporting weight and lubricating joint surfaces. Loss of this fluid, called synovial fluid, results in a gradual decrease in cartilage thickness and increase in friction, which is related to the degradation and joint pain of osteoarthritis. Since cartilage is porous, fluid is readily squeezed out of the holes over time. Yet the symptoms associated with osteoarthritis usually take decades to develop. Researchers have now proposed a mechanism that explains how motion can cause cartilage to reabsorb liquid that leaks out.

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