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  • Omega-3 fatty acids may help reduce risk of hip fracture in postmenopausal women

    Source - Healio

    The risk of hip fractures in postmenopausal women may be reduced through consuming more omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, according to a study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

    “We don’t yet know whether omega-3 supplementation would affect results for bone health or other outcomes,” Tonya Orchard, PhD, RD, LD, from Ohio State University, stated in a press release. “Though it is premature to make a nutrition recommendation based on this work, I do think this study adds a little more strength to current recommendations to include more omega-3s in the diet in the form of fish, and suggests that plant sources of omega-3 may be just as important for preventing hip fractures in women.”

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  • Women with lupus seem at higher risk for hip fractures

    Source - MedlinePlus

    Women with lupus the autoimmune disease that can damage skin, joints and organs also are at higher risk of a hip fracture known as a cervical fracture, new research from Taiwan suggests.

    Dr. Shu-Hung Wang, of the Taipei Veterans General Hospital, and his colleagues evaluated nearly 15,000 adults 90 percent of them women who had lupus. They followed them for an average of six years. During that time, 75 suffered a hip fracture. Of those, 57 were cervical fractures of the hip; the other 18 were trochanteric fractures of the hip

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  • After elbow surgery, successful long-term results enjoyed by baseball players

    Source - Medical News Today

    Baseball players undergoing ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) surgery are able to return to the same or higher level of competition for an extended period of time, according to research presented at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Annual Meeting in Chicago, IL.

    "Previous studies showed successful return to play after UCL surgery, but we were also able to evaluate each athlete's career longevity and reason for retirement," commented lead author, Daryl C. Osbahr, MD of MedStar Union Memorial Hospital in Baltimore. "These players typically returned to play within a year of surgery and averaged an additional 3.6 years of playing time, a significant amount considering the extensive nature of this surgery in a highly competitive group of athletes. They also typically did not retire from baseball secondary to continued elbow problems."

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  • Sports injuries strike again

    Source - dailyRx

    Sports are a great way for kids to get exercise and have fun. But sometimes young athletes get hurt. Many sports injuries are mild and heal on their own. Others — such as knee ligament tears — may be more serious and require surgery.

    Athletes who have had surgery to repair knee ligament tears are more likely to experience another knee ligament tear than uninjured athletes, according to a recent study.

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  • Knee replacement often beneficial for RA: study

    Source - WebMD

    The common belief that rheumatoid arthritis patients don't benefit from knee replacement surgery as much as those with the more common osteoarthritis has been challenged by the findings from a pair of studies by New York City scientists.

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  • Different options for shoulder replacement

    Source - PalmBeachPost.com

    Question: I am considering having my shoulder replaced. What questions should I be asking my doctor?


    Answer: The decision to replace your shoulder joint is a very serious one. The most important factor in choosing a surgeon is their experience.


    A study that was published out of Duke University in 2004 demonstrated that the risk of a post-operative complication was reduced by more than 50 percent when surgeons performed a high volume of shoulder replacements in a high-volume hospital, compared to surgeons and hospitals performing relatively few of these procedures. This high volume is typical of shoulder fellowship-trained surgeons.

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  • Shoulder surgery may make sense for young patients: research

    Source - MD India

    According to research presented today at the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Annual Meeting in Chicago, IL, arthroscopic bankart repair surgery is a cost-effective approach for patients suffering their first shoulder dislocation.

    "We based our conclusions on a Markov model, which takes into account how surgery affects the patient's recovery in relation to the actual costs of medical treatment," commented Ryan P. Donegan, MD, MS, from Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, NH. "For surgery to be cost-effective in this model, expenses must be under $24,457, the probability of re-dislocation must be under 7 percent, and the quality of life rating must not fall below 0.86. Our research showed surgical costs of $11,267, probability of re-dislocation at only 4 percent and quality of life rating of 0.93 - numbers suggesting surgery is a good investment for these patients."

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  • Better posture can help ease shoulder pain from impingement

    Source - UT Sandiego

    Shoulder pain from impingement occurs frequently as the rotator cuff tendons and sometimes a bursal sac get pinched under the roof of the shoulder blade or the acromion. People with a downward slope of the acromion, or who have developed bone spurs from arthritis in the adjacent acromioclavicular (AC) joint, are more susceptible to developing such impingement.

    The mechanism causing this disorder may be a gradual or sudden elevation of the ball of the shoulder joint, squishing the described soft tissues against the acromion roof. The rotator cuff muscles are responsible for keeping the ball of the shoulder joint down and away from the roof as we elevate the arm.

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  • Distal radial fractures heal by direct woven bone formation

    Source - MDLinx

    Descriptions of fracture healing almost exclusively deal with shaft fractures and they often emphasize endochondral bone formation. In reality, most fractures occur in metaphysealcancellous bone. Apart from a study of vertebral fractures, authors have not found any histological description of cancellous bone healing in humans. The histology suggests that cells in the midst of the marrow respond to the trauma by direct formation of bone, independently of trabecular surfaces.

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  • No Time to Hesitate Before Hip Surgeryl

    Source - dailyRx

    Older adults who take a bad fall or blow to the hip might need to act quickly. If the hip's fractured, there's no time to delay.

    A study recently presented at a conference found that delaying surgery to treat a fractured hip more than two days increased the odds of dying by about 10 percent.

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